AGen2023 Overview


Join us in Tokyo and Online for AGen2023!

March 31 – April 3, 2023 | Toshi Center Hotel, Tokyo, Japan, and Online

Recognising and promoting the inherent dignity of people at all ages represents a foundational goal shared by societies around the world. The desire to identify meaning and value in life underpins inquiries into law and politics, religion and the arts, and it guides the resolution of ethical questions associated with scientific inquiry and resulting innovations. As medical science, public health and technology continue to advance, so lives have grown progressively longer. Increasingly, this leads to new questions regarding the kind of lives we will experience as we grow older. While advances in science and medicine increase longevity, what innovative technologies are emerging that address the changing needs faced by an aging world? Researchers, scientists, and advocates will gather in Tokyo for AGen2023 to discuss these questions and others.

Japan represents a unique location for research professionals to meet and explore the topic of aging. Japan has one of the most rapidly aging populations, which combined with a declining birthrate, represents a compelling example of the demographic transition resulting from increased longevity. The issues and challenges faced in Japan have expanded to other Pacific nations, Europe, Africa, and the Americas as all nations experience the benefits of increased longevity. Worldwide, there is a growing recognition that the kind of life we now give our elders will impact the way we will be treated and cared for as we enter our later years. Because aging is a worldwide phenomenon, the needs and opportunities of an aging world must also reflect and respect cultural and social diversity in developing programs that encourage quality of life at all ages. How do we address the collective needs of the aging population while respecting each person’s individuality? AGen2023 provides an ideal forum for discussing and debating the many issues related to aging and gerontology. Submissions from a variety of fields and perspectives are welcomed and encouraged. Original research across disciplines, including science and technology, philosophy and politics, sociology, and psychology, will ensure an active and exciting opportunity to expand our gerontological understanding.

Now entering its ninth year, the AGen2023 Organising Committee has seen the conference grow in size and diversity of perspectives as it attracts researchers and practitioners from around the world to address this crucial topic. This year is particularly exciting as AGen will be partnering with The Asian Conference on Psychology & the Behavioral Sciences (ACP2023), increasing opportunities for broad multidisciplinary exchanges.

Held in partnership with the IAFOR Research Centre at the Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP) at Osaka University, this international conference encourages academics and scholars to meet and exchange ideas and views in a forum stimulating respectful dialogue. This event will afford an exceptional opportunity for renewing old acquaintances, making new contacts, networking, and facilitating partnerships across national and disciplinary borders.

In conjunction with our Global Partners, we look forward to extending you a warm welcome to Tokyo in 2023.

– The AGen2023 Programme Committee

Key Information
  • Location & Venue: Held in Tokyo, Japan, and online
  • Dates: Friday, March 31, 2023 ​to Monday, April 03, 2023
  • Early Bird Abstract Submission Deadline: October 28, 2022*
  • Final Abstract Submission Deadline: January 10, 2023
  • Registration Deadline for Presenters: February 09, 2023

*Submit early to take advantage of the discounted registration rates. Learn more about our registration options.

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Speakers

  • Yu Niiya
    Yu Niiya
    Hosei University, Japan

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Programme

  • Whose Time Am I Spending? Nonzero-sum Time Perception Promotes Psychological Well-being and Prosociality
    Whose Time Am I Spending? Nonzero-sum Time Perception Promotes Psychological Well-being and Prosociality
    Keynote Presentation: Yu Niiya

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Conference Committees

Global Programme Committee

Dr Joseph Haldane, Chairman and CEO, IAFOR
His Excellency Professor Toshiya Hoshino, Osaka University, Japan
Professor Barbara Lockee, Virginia Tech., USA
Professor Donald E. Hall, Binghamton University, USA
Dr James W. McNally, University of Michigan, USA & NACDA Program on Aging
Professor Haruko Satoh, Osaka University, Japan
Dr Grant Black, Chuo University, Japan
Professor Dexter Da Silva, Keisen University, Tokyo
Professor Gary Swanson, University of Northern Colorado, USA
Professor Baden Offord, Curtin University, Australia
Professor Frank Ravitch, Michigan State University, USA
Professor Will Baber, Kyoto University, Japan

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Conference Programme Committee

Dr Joseph Haldane, The International Academic Forum (IAFOR), Japan
Professor James W. McNally, University of Michigan, USA & NACDA Program on Aging
Professor Sela V. Panapasa, University of Michigan, USA
Lowell Sheppard, Never Too Late Academy, Japan
Professor Haruko Satoh, Osaka University, Japan

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IAFOR International Academic Advisory Board

Sustainability, Energy & Environment Section

Dr June Henton, Auburn University, USA
Fan Li, LePing Social Entrepreneur Foundation & Stanford Social Innovation Review (SSIR), China
Professor Mark Pegrum, The University of Western Australia, Australia
Dr Philip Sugai, Doshisha University, Japan
Professor Denis Binder, Chapman University, USA
Brian Aycock, IAFOR Research Centre
Dr James W. McNally, University of Michigan, USA & NACDA Program on Aging
Ms Karen Newby, Par les mots solidaires, France
Dr Tom Houghton, Curtin University, Australia
Dr Maxime Jaffré, United Arab Emirates University, United Arab Emirates
Dr Elena Raevskikh, Department of Culture and Tourism Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
Mr Lowell Sheppard, HOPE International Development Agency, Japan


Politics, Law & International Relations Section

Dr Joel Campbell, Troy University, Japan
Dr Keiichi Ogawa, Kobe University, Japan
Professor Denis Binder, Chapman University, USA
Brian Aycock, IAFOR Research Centre
Dr Eddie Bruce-Jones, Birkbeck College School of Law, University of London, UK
Dr Yukinori Komine, Harvard University, USA
Dr Craig Mark, Tokyo Denki University, Japan
Professor Frank S. Ravitch, Michigan State University College of Law, USA
Mr Michael Liam Kedzlie, Barrister and Solicitor of the High Court of New Zealand
Professor Haruko Satoh, Osaka University, Japan


Business & Economics Section

Harry Hill, Japan United States Friendship Commission (JUSFC), Japan
Fan Li, LePing Social Entrepreneur Foundation & Stanford Social Innovation Review (SSIR), China
Dr Philip Sugai, Doshisha University, Japan
Daniel Kjellsson, Future Talent Council, Sweden
Dr Grant Black, Chuo University, Japan
Professor Will Baber, Kyoto University Graduate School of Management, Japan
Dr Sarah Louisa Birchley, Toyo Gakuen University, Japan
Professor Johannes Moenius, University of Redlands, USA
Professor Anshuman Khare, Athabasca University, Canada
Dr Tingting Ying, Ningbo University of Technology, China
Dr Tom Houghton, Curtin University, Australia


Psychology & Behavioral Sciences Section

Dr Cynthia Northington-Purdie, William Patterson University, United States
Professor Geoff Beattie, Edge Hill University, United Kingdom
Professor Dennis McInerney, Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong
Professor Dexter Da Silva, Keisen University, Japan
Dr Monty P. Satiadarma, Tarumanagara University, Indonesia
Dr Shahrokh (Sharo) Shafaie, Southeast Missouri State University, United States
Dr Amy Szarkowski, Harvard Medical School, United States
Dr Deborah G. Wooldridge, Bowling Green State University, United States

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Conference Review Committee

IAFOR's peer review process, which involves both reciprocal review and the use of Review Committees, is overseen by conference Organising Committee members under the guidance of the Academic Governing Board. Review Committee members are established academics who hold PhDs or other terminal degrees in their fields and who have previous peer review experience.

If you would like to apply to serve on the AGen2023 Review Committee, please visit our application page.

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IAFOR Research Centre (IRC) – “Innovation and Value Initiative”

The IAFOR Research Centre (IRC) is housed within Osaka University’s School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), and in June 2018 the IRC began an ambitious new “Innovation and Value Initiative”. Officially launched at the United Nations in a special UN-IAFOR Collaborative Session, the initiative seeks to bring together the best in interdisciplinary research around the concept of value, on how value can be recognised, and measured, and how this can help us address issues and solve problems, from the local to the global.

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Yu Niiya
Hosei University, Japan

Biography

Dr Yu Niiya is a Professor in the Department of Global and Interdisciplinary Studies (GIS) at Hosei University, Tokyo, Japan. She received her MA from the University of Tokyo and her PhD from the University of Michigan. Dr Niiya’s research interests lie in the exploration of whether a compassionate mindset can encourage people to overcome their hesitation to take risks. For example, she investigated how having compassionate goals (i.e., the goals to support others) predict the extent to which people express dissent toward the group they belong to, or the extent to which they will offer help to a stranger. Furthermore, she has worked on what enables people to learn from failure, the positive relational consequences of adult’s amae, and many cross-cultural studies on various topics. She received the International Contributions to Psychology Award from the Japanese Psychological Association in 2021. She has been a PI (principal investigator) and collaborator on many Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (KAKENHI) projects for the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. Previously, she was also an associate editor for the Asian Journal of Social Psychology and is currently associate editor of the Japanese Journal of Social Psychology and the Japanese Journal of Psychology.

Keynote Presentation (2022) | Whose Time Am I Spending? Nonzero-sum Time Perception Promotes Psychological Well-being and Prosociality
Whose Time Am I Spending? Nonzero-sum Time Perception Promotes Psychological Well-being and Prosociality
Keynote Presentation: Yu Niiya

In modern societies, time is a precious asset. Just like money, we invest, trade, spend, save, borrow, give, lose, and even steal time. Just like money, we see it as a zero-sum resource that can be taken or given. But time could be also conceived as a nonzero-sum: Time may be just there, created moment by moment, and may not belong to anybody. Drawing on an experience sampling survey and a series of experiments, I will present empirical evidence which demonstrates that when people perceive that time spent on others is time spent on the self and vice versa (i.e., they perceive time as nonzero-sum), they experience greater relatedness, autonomy, competence, and satisfaction with life, less stress and time pressure, and more willingness to spend time helping others. None of these effects appeared when people perceived that they were offering or sacrificing their time for others or when others were taking away their time (i.e., perceive time as zero-sum). Drawing on the ecosystem theory of relationships (Crocker & Canevello, 2015), I will suggest that people can enhance psychological well-being and prosociality when they care for others without sacrificing the self.

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