AGen2018


"Surviving and Thriving in Times of Change"

June 8–10, 2018 | Art Center Kobe, Kobe, Japan

Perspectives on the aging lifecourse and the role of the elderly within society have undergone massive change in the past decades. Once the later stages of aging were seen as period of withdrawal from social interactions as the elder reflected on a life lived and prepared for and inevitable death. This viewpoint has changed dramatically in recent years as new opportunities for enhancing their quality of life, better medical care, support services and life extension technologies Similarly, changing demographic composition of many low fertility nations have made the elderly more essential to maintain the workforce and offer opportunities for older adults to remain economically active long after traditional retirement ages. The growth of the elderly population has also encouraged growth in the institutional and home care industries, often creating a growing demand for immigrants to provide services to the growing number of elders who require assistance to maintain an independent lifestyle.

The dynamic tension of surviving versus thriving as reflected conference theme encapsulates the new perspective now emerging in gerontological research, that of “resilience”. Traditionally, quality of life among the aged was measured by the concept of frailty, which used measures such as Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) to measure loss of functioning, and declines in ability to accomplish task seen as essential to independent living. Under a “resilience” model, however, we seek to measure the aging process from a more positive perspective that focuses on the ability of the elder to maintain an independent life in spite of potential barriers. Once we saw disabled elders as merely surviving with the reduced function associated with senescence, now we seek new ways to help elders thrive and overcome limitations.

The AGen2018 conference seeks to encourage research across a number of broad themes associated with transitions that are changing our views of aging from “surviving” to “thriving”.

One theme is that of “Successful Aging”; what behaviours, activities and choices made across the lifecourse result in a healthier and more active elderly population. This approach takes a life course approach that invites research on studies that look at health and choices at all ages and life stages, and how these choices impact quality of life among the aged.

A second theme is in the growing body of research that looks at “life extension”. This line of research tries to understand the biology of aging and how gene therapy or medicines could be used to increase longevity, creating a growing cohort of centenarians. Research on telomere length, gut bacteria, and other “aging clocks” are still in their infancy but many scientists feel they can slow, if not reverse the aging process. A third theme is that of assistive devices that help an aging population maintain independence and get the help they need to be autonomous. This line of research includes companion robots, exoskeletons, and the field of gerotechnology which has developed an entire series of tools and resources to make living at home more practical and enhances the autonomy of the aged.

Finally, there is the theme of support services; how can family and support programs better assist the aged in remaining independent and productive and what point do we as an individual, family, community, or clinician make a reasoned decision about institutionalization and 24-hour care.

These are only a few of the broad themes we seek research papers and posters for AGen2018. The aged are living longer and thriving in ways that were impossible only a few decades ago. The theme of Surviving and Thriving in Times of Change is particularly reflective of the changing world which the current cohort of elders are entering. AGen2018 welcomes any paper or analysis which address the ways in which change is impacting the lives of the elderly, and the live of the current generations who will join the ranks of the aged in years to come.

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Programme

  • Health Across the Lifecourse
    Health Across the Lifecourse
    Featured Panel Presentation: James W. McNally, Hiroshi Ishida & Megumi Rosenberg
  • Surviving and Thriving: In Pursuit of a Sustainable World – A Unique and Personal Reflection
    Surviving and Thriving: In Pursuit of a Sustainable World – A Unique and Personal Reflection
    Featured Presentation: Lowell Sheppard
  • Locating Data for Research: Data Collections and Resources for Thesis Writing, Teaching, and Grant Development for the Social Sciences and the Environment
    Locating Data for Research: Data Collections and Resources for Thesis Writing, Teaching, and Grant Development for the Social Sciences and the Environment
    Featured Workshop Presentation: James W McNally & Kathryn Lavender
  • Towards a Universal Standard of Value through Blockchain
    Towards a Universal Standard of Value through Blockchain
    Featured Presentation: Philip Sugai
  • What you see and What you do
    What you see and What you do
    Featured Workshop Presentation: Will Baber
  • IAFOR Documentary Photography Award 2017 | Award Winners Screening
    IAFOR Documentary Photography Award 2017 | Award Winners Screening
  • IAFOR Silk Road Initiative Information Session
    IAFOR Silk Road Initiative Information Session

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Speakers

  • William Baber
    William Baber
    Kyoto University Graduate School of Management, Japan
  • Hiroshi Ishida
    Hiroshi Ishida
    University of Tokyo, Japan
  • Kathryn M. Lavender
    Kathryn M. Lavender
    National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging (NACDA)
  • James W. McNally
    James W. McNally
    University of Michigan, USA & NACDA Program on Aging
  • Megumi Rosenberg
    Megumi Rosenberg
    World Health Organization (WHO), Japan
  • Lowell Sheppard
    Lowell Sheppard
    HOPE International Development Agency, Japan
  • Philip Sugai
    Philip Sugai
    Doshisha Business School, Japan

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Organising Committee

The Organising Committee of The Asian Conference on Aging & Gerontology (AGen) is composed of distinguished academics who are experts in their fields. Organising Committee members may also be members of IAFOR's International Academic Advisory Board. The Organising Committee is responsible for nominating and vetting Keynote and Featured Speakers; developing the conference programme, including special workshops, panels, targeted sessions, and so forth; event outreach and promotion; recommending and attracting future Organising Committee members; working with IAFOR to select PhD students and early career academics for IAFOR-funded grants and scholarships; and overseeing the reviewing of abstracts submitted to the conference.

  • Joseph Haldane
    Joseph Haldane
    The International Academic Forum (IAFOR), Japan
  • Hiroshi Ishida
    Hiroshi Ishida
    University of Tokyo, Japan
  • James W. McNally
    James W. McNally
    University of Michigan, USA & NACDA Program on Aging
  • Sela V. Panapasa
    Sela V. Panapasa
    University of Michigan, USA
  • Haruko Satoh
    Haruko Satoh
    Osaka University, Japan

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Review Committee

IAFOR's peer review process, which involves both reciprocal review and the use of Review Committees, is overseen by conference Organising Committee members under the guidance of the Academic Governing Board. Review Committee members are established academics who hold PhDs or other terminal degrees in their fields and who have previous peer review experience.

If you would like to apply to serve on the AGen Review Committee, please visit our application page.

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Health Across the Lifecourse
Featured Panel Presentation: James W. McNally, Hiroshi Ishida & Megumi Rosenberg

This panel looks at the changing ways we look at health and the transitions from treating "aging" as a unique and independent experience to a more global perspective on health across the lifecourse. The experiences of youth, social determinants of health, poverty, and other factors all impact quality of life in later life. The way our perception of health, aging and successful aging has changed, also shifts they way we look at data needs, analysis and the study of the lifecourse.

Each panelist will give a brief overview from their perspectives on the lifecourse and how data plays a role in understanding global health issues. This will be followed by a question and answer session.

Read presenter biographies.

Surviving and Thriving: In Pursuit of a Sustainable World – A Unique and Personal Reflection
Featured Presentation: Lowell Sheppard

Drawing on his experience working in and writing about intensely dysfunctional communities, the result of war, disaster and extreme poverty, Lowell will present a personal perspective on the challenges those communities face to become self-reliant through sustainable development.

Read presenter biographies.

Locating Data for Research: Data Collections and Resources for Thesis Writing, Teaching, and Grant Development for the Social Sciences and the Environment
Featured Workshop Presentation: James W McNally & Kathryn Lavender

Instructors

James W McNally, Director, NACDA Program on Aging
Kathryn Lavender, Program Manager, NACDA Program on Aging

Researchers increasingly recognize the value of public use data for secondary research, thesis development, training and education and the development of independent research grants. As cutting edge international studies are emerging across Asia, Latin America, Europe, and increasingly Africa the opportunities for cross-national and comparative research are growing exponentially. This is a particularly exciting time to work, due to the large number of trained research professionals working within their home countries and providing culturally grounded interpretations of results. An ongoing barrier, however, is knowing where and what kind of data are available for secondary analysis.

The creation and maintenance of sustainable data archives can be challenging but it offers clear advantages for a national and international research strategy. Data that is preserved can be used by multiple researchers, testing a variety of hypotheses and increasing the return on investment to the expensive process of data collection. Having an internally managed archival system also provides greater control and autonomy in the equitable distribution of data resources. This workshop, sponsored by IAFOR and the National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging (NACDA) will offer hands-on examples of how to discover data resources, obtain them and then implement them as part of a research strategy. Regardless of whether or not you are a student looking for a thesis topic, an instructor looking for research material to using classroom teaching, or an established researcher looking for new opportunities the wealth of publicly available data has created almost unlimited opportunities to explore new themes and to collaborate with other researchers worldwide. NACDA has been in existence for over 35 years, and its preserves and really distributes over 1,500 studies on the lifecourse and health in the United States and worldwide. Funded by the National Institute on Aging in the United States, NACDA represents one of the world’s largest collections of research data. NACDA is only one of many such organizations, and increasingly these data resources can be found, if not in your home country then only a click away via the Internet.

The workshop will introduce you to NACDA and are many research partners across the world. All researchers attending The Asian Conference on Aging & Gerontology 2018 (AGen2018), The Asian Conference on the Social Sciences 2018 (ACSS2018) or The Asian Conference on Sustainability, Energy & the Environment 2018 (ACSEE2018) are welcome to participate in this workshop, ask questions and learn about data resources you can use for research, classroom instruction or in developing a research paper or thesis for your college classes. All you need is your laptop or mobile device and our instructors will help you better understand the wealth of information that lies at your fingertips.

An IAFOR Workshop in collaboration with the University of Michigan

Read presenter biographies.

Towards a Universal Standard of Value through Blockchain
Featured Presentation: Philip Sugai

Value is at the heart of the definition of marketing, yet to date, neither researchers nor practitioners (1) have a precise definition of value, (2) possess a consistent way to measure it, and because of this (3) lack a consistent understanding of the fundamental drivers of the value that they research, create, manage and grow. At the same time, blockchain technology has been touted as “The Internet of Value” (Tapscott & Tapscott, 2017) providing researchers and practitioners with a non-refutable, distributed ledger of value creation or destruction across every transaction. The purpose of this paper is to create and test a theoretical model for the application of blockchain technology to marketing practice with the aim of deepening our scholarly and practical knowledge of how value is created, measured and managed for customers, firms, employees, partners, society and the planet.

There is a strong and growing global interest in expanded theoretical approaches to conceptualising the value that firms create through their products and services, and the activities that they perform in order to design, create, sell, service, reclaim and recycle these (c.f. Porter & Kramer (2011) and their Creating Shared Value model, and Eccles & Viviers, (2011) who explore Environmental, Social, Government (ESG) investing practices). However, these models lack a practical, objective approach to measuring and managing the value that firms create for customers, firms, employees, partners, society and the planet that can be consistently adopted by organisations that wish to implement these ideas, and track the actual value that is generated from their activities. This presentation provides the first assessment of the literature as it applies to value measurement across these six value actors, and outlines how this foundation can be operationalised through a blockchain-based universal value standard.

Read presenter biographies.

What you see and What you do
Featured Workshop Presentation: Will Baber

The workshop is based on current research in the field of negotiation. Workshop participants will investigate negotiation behaviours and thinking through a survey as well as small group work on short cases and examples. The behaviours and thinking represent cognitive schemata about negotiation that the workshop leader has investigated in the context of various industries and cultures. To be considered in the workshop are the behaviours observed in the real world, the preferred behaviours, and the thinking of participants.

The workshop will introduce and review some general aspects of negotiating in professional contexts in order to bring the audience to the same approximate page: negotiating in and among organisations in the context of professional work. Workshop participants will complete a survey online and the aggregated responses will be discussed. The short cases will be the subject of small group efforts to analyse and make decisions about possible next actions. Finally, a general discussion will ensue about what makes good negotiators good and the pros and cons of certain behaviours.

Read presenter biographies.

IAFOR Documentary Photography Award 2017 | Award Winners Screening

The IAFOR Documentary Photography Award was launched by The International Academic Forum (IAFOR) in 2015 as an international photography award that seeks to promote and assist in the professional development of emerging documentary photographers and photojournalists. The award has benefitted since the outset from the expertise of an outstanding panel of internationally renowned photographers, including Dr Paul Lowe as the Founding Judge, and Ed Kashi, Monica Allende, Simon Roberts, Jocelyn Bain Hogg, Simon Norfolk and Emma Bowkett as Guest Judges. Now in its third year, the award has already been widely recognised by those in the industry and has been supported by World Press Photo, Metro Imaging, MediaStorm, Think Tank Photo, University of the Arts London, RMIT University, British Journal of Photography, The Centre for Documentary Practice, and the Medill School of Journalism.

As an organisation, IAFOR’s mission is to promote international exchange, facilitate intercultural awareness, encourage interdisciplinary discussion, and generate and share new knowledge. In keeping with this mission, in appreciation of the great value of photography as a medium that can be shared across borders of language, culture and nation, and to influence and inform our academic work and programmes, the IAFOR Documentary Photography Award was launched as a competition that would help underline the importance of the organisation’s aims, and would promote and recognise best practice and excellence.

Winners of the IAFOR Documentary Photography Award 2017 were announced at The European Conference on Media, Communication & Film 2017 (EuroMedia2017) in Brighton, UK. The award follows the theme of the EuroMedia conference, with 2017’s theme being “History, Story, Narrative”. In support of up-and-coming talent, the IAFOR Documentary Photography Award is free to enter.

Access to the Award Winners Screening is included in the conference registration fee. For more information about the award, click here.

Image | From the project Single Mothers of Afghanistan by IAFOR Documentary Photography Award 2017 Grand Prize Winner, Kiana Hayeri.

IAFOR Silk Road Initiative Information Session

As an organization, IAFOR’s mission is to promote international exchange, facilitate intercultural awareness, encourage interdisciplinary discussion, and generate and share new knowledge. In 2018, we are excited to launch a major new and ambitious international, intercultural and interdisciplinary research initiative which uses the silk road trade routes as a lens through which to study some of the world’s largest historical and contemporary geopolitical trends, shifts and exchanges.

IAFOR is headquartered in Japan, and the 2018 inauguration of this project aligns with the 150th Anniversary of the Meiji Restoration of 1868, when Japan opened its doors to the trade and ideas that would precipitate its rapid modernisation and its emergence as a global power. At a time when global trends can seem unpredictable, and futures fearful, the IAFOR Silk Road Initiative gives the opportunity to revisit the question of the impact of international relations from a long-term perspective.

This ambitious initiative will encourage individuals and institutions working across the world to support and undertake research centring on the contact between countries and regions in Europe and Asia – from Gibraltar to Japan – and the maritime routes that went beyond, into the South-East Continent and the Philippines, and later out into the Pacific Islands and the United States. The IAFOR Silk Road Initiative will be concerned with all aspects of this contact, and will examine both material and intellectual traces, as well as consequences.

For more information about the IAFOR Silk Road Initiative, click here.

William Baber
Kyoto University Graduate School of Management, Japan

Biography

Will Baber has combined education with business throughout his career, teaching business students in Japan and Europe and working in economic development for the State of Maryland and language services in Washington, DC. In his work he has frequently encountered cross cultural conflicts and synergies. He studies these issues as an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Management of Kyoto University. His research interests include cross-cultural adaptation and the impact of expatriates on the workplace.

Featured Workshop Presentation (2018) | What you see and What you do
Hiroshi Ishida
University of Tokyo, Japan

Biography

Hiroshi Ishida is Professor of Sociology at the Institute of Social Sciences, University of Tokyo. He served as the Director of the Institute of Social Sciences and the Director of the Center of Social Research and Data Archives, at the University of Tokyo, from 2012 to 2015. He received his PhD in sociology from Harvard University, conducted post-doctoral research at Nuffield College and St. Antony’s College, University of Oxford, and held positions of Assistant and Associate Professor of Sociology at Columbia University. He was a Visiting Professor of Sociology at the University of Michigan and a Visiting Fellow of Sociology at Yale University.

Professor Ishida’s research interests include comparative social stratification and mobility, school-to-work transition, and social inequality over the life course. He is the author of Social Mobility in Contemporary Japan (Stanford University Press) and the co-editor with David Slater of Social Class in Contemporary Japan (Routledge). His work has been published in a number of journals and edited volumes, including American Journal of Sociology, American Sociological Review, British Journal of Sociology, European Sociological Review, and Japanese Sociological Review.

Professor Ishida was the president of the Japanese Association of Mathematical Sociology from 2011 to 2013, and currently serves as the secretary/treasurer of the Research Committee on Social Stratification of the International Sociological Association. From 2005 to 2010, he was the editor-in-chief of Social Science Japan Journal, an international journal on social science research on Japan published by Oxford University Press. He is the principal investigator of the Japanese Life Course Panel Surveys, funded by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. He presently serves on the international editorial board of several journals, including British Journal of Sociology, European Sociological Review, and Social Forces. He is currently the Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) Official Representative for the University of Tokyo.

Featured Panel Presentation (2018) | Health Across the Lifecourse

Previous Presentations

Featured Panel Presentation (2017) | Easts Meets West – Healthy, Active and Beautiful Aging in Asia
Kathryn M. Lavender
National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging (NACDA)

Biography

Kathryn joined the National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging (NACDA) team in November 2017 as project manager. She is involved with day to day operations including data deposits, restricted-use data agreements, data user requests, as well as long-term planning of NACDA activities in the research community.

Before transitioning to NACDA, Kathryn Lavender came to ICPSR from UofM Dearborn as a co-op student, and accepted a full-time position after graduating with her degree in economics. She has been involved in many areas of ICPSR, from curating data across different projects and supervising curation staff to event planning with the summer internship program. As of this April, Kathryn has been an official ICPSR staff member for 10 years.

Featured Workshop Presentation (2018) | Locating Data for Research: Data Collections and Resources for Thesis Writing, Teaching, and Grant Development for the Social Sciences and the Environment

This presentation is co-sponsored by IAFOR and The University of Michigan

James W. McNally
University of Michigan, USA & NACDA Program on Aging

Biography

Dr James W. McNally is the Director of the NACDA Program on Aging, a data archive containing over 1,500 studies related to health and the aging lifecourse. He currently does methodological research on the improvement and enhancement of secondary research data and has been cited as an expert authority on data imputation. Dr McNally has directed the NACDA Program on Aging since 1998 and has seen the archive significantly increase its holdings with a growing collection of seminal studies on the aging lifecourse, health, retirement and international aspects of aging. He has spent much of his career addressing methodological issues with a specific focus on specialized application of incomplete or deficient data and the enhancement of secondary data for research applications. Dr McNally has also worked extensively on issues related to international aging and changing perspectives on the role of family support in the later stages of the aging lifecourse.

Featured Panel Presentation (2018) | Health Across the Lifecourse
Featured Workshop Presentation (2018) | Locating Data for Research: Data Collections and Resources for Thesis Writing, Teaching, and Grant Development for the Social Sciences and the Environment

Previous Presentations

Featured Presentation (2017) | Methodologies for the Collection of Comparative Community Level Public Health Data: Obtaining Powerful and Statistically Meaningful Findings for Small Populations
Featured Panel Presentation (2017) | Easts Meets West – Healthy, Active and Beautiful Aging in Asia
Megumi Rosenberg
World Health Organization (WHO), Japan

Biography

Dr Megumi Rosenberg has been a Technical Officer for the World Health Organization (WHO) Centre for Health Development in Kobe, Japan, since 2009. She conducts research in the areas of health metrics, urban health, health equity and ageing. She also provides technical assistance on these matters to national and local health officials in WHO Member States. Her recent work includes the Global Report on Urban Health (2016) and the Age-friendly City core indicator guide (2015). Previously, she was a Senior Researcher in public health and disasters at the Southern California Injury Prevention Research Centre of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). She received her undergraduate degree in liberal arts from the International Christian University in Tokyo, and her master and doctorate degrees in public health from the UCLA School of Public Health.

Featured Panel Presentation (2018) | Health Across the Lifecourse
Lowell Sheppard
HOPE International Development Agency, Japan

Biography

Lowell Sheppard is Asia Pacific Director of the HOPE International Development Agency, an organisation that works to improve the supply of basic human necessities to the world’s extreme poor. Aside from his 25-year involvement with HOPE, Lowell has dedicated much of his life to social and environmental improvement projects throughout the world. He was the Chairman of the Whose Earth initiative in the UK, and was the founding Chairman of Novimost, a non-government organisation responding to the needs caused by war in the Balkans. He was also CEO of one of the UK’s largest youth charities and an executive member of Spring Harvest, an annual Christian festival which attracts more than 60,000 people each Easter, and raises more than one million dollars for charities every year. A fellow of the Royal Geographic Society, Mr Sheppard is the author of six books, which reflect his diverse intellectual interests and life experience. His latest book, Boys Becoming Men, examines the importance of rites of passage, including adventures, for children becoming adults. Lowell is a noted public speaker, and has given lectures at both undergraduate and postgraduate level on Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability, and he is a former vice-chairman of the CSR Committee for the American Chamber of Commerce in Japan.

Keynote Presentation (2018) | Surviving and Thriving: In Pursuit of a Sustainable World – A Unique and Personal Reflection
Philip Sugai
Doshisha Business School, Japan

Biography

Dr Sugai joined the Global MBA faculty at Doshisha Business School as a full-time faculty member in September 2013. He currently teaches Marketing, eMarketing, Marketing Research, and Sustainable & Responsible Marketing. Dr Sugai is also a Visiting Professor at Stanford University, where he teaches an undergraduate course on Innovation in Japan at the Stanford Overseas campus in Kyoto. Prior to joining the Doshisha University faculty, Dr Sugai taught at the International University of Japan in Niigata from January 2002, where he also served as Associate Dean and Dean of the IUJ Business School for six years.

Dr Sugai is the author of two books, The Value Plan and The Six Immutable Laws of Mobile Business (John Wiley & Sons), and has published case studies on KITKAT Japan, Australia’s AGL, Hatsune Miku and Walt Disney Internet Group, all of which are available through the Harvard Business School Publishing case study portal. He received his doctorate from Waseda University’s Graduate School of Global Information and Telecommunications Studies, and his MBA in Marketing and Operations Management from New York University’s Stern School of Business. He has worked as a marketing executive at American Express, Muze and Lightningcast, and currently serves as a marketing advisor and marketing strategy consultant to companies both in Japan and globally.

Featured Presentation (2018) | Towards a Universal Standard of Value through Blockchain

Previous Presentations

Featured Presentation (2017) | Establishing a Value Mindset
Joseph Haldane
The International Academic Forum (IAFOR), Japan

Biography

Joseph Haldane is the Chairman and CEO of IAFOR. He is responsible for devising strategy, setting policies, forging institutional partnerships, implementing projects, and overseeing the organisation’s business and academic operations, including research, publications and events.

Dr Haldane holds a PhD from the University of London in 19th-century French Studies, and has had full-time faculty positions at the University of Paris XII Paris-Est Créteil (France), Sciences Po Paris (France), and Nagoya University of Commerce and Business (Japan), as well as visiting positions at the French Press Institute in the University of Paris II Panthéon-Assas (France), The School of Journalism at Sciences Po Paris (France), and the School of Journalism at Moscow State University (Russia).

Dr Haldane’s current research concentrates on post-war and contemporary politics and international affairs, and since 2015 he has been a Guest Professor at The Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP) at Osaka University, where he teaches on the postgraduate Global Governance Course, and Co-Director of the OSIPP-IAFOR Research Centre, an interdisciplinary think tank situated within Osaka University.

He is also a Visiting Professor in the Faculty of Philology at the University of Belgrade, a Member of the International Advisory Council of the Department of Educational Foundations at the College of Education of the University of Hawaii at Manoa, and a Member of the World Economic Forum’s Expert Network for Global Governance.

From 2012 to 2014, Dr Haldane served as Treasurer of the American Chamber of Commerce in Japan (Chubu Region) and he is currently a Trustee of the HOPE International Development Agency (Japan). He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society in 2012, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts in 2015.

A black belt in judo, he is married with two children, and lives in Japan.

Hiroshi Ishida
University of Tokyo, Japan

Biography

Hiroshi Ishida is Professor of Sociology at the Institute of Social Sciences, University of Tokyo. He served as the Director of the Institute of Social Sciences and the Director of the Center of Social Research and Data Archives, at the University of Tokyo, from 2012 to 2015. He received his PhD in sociology from Harvard University, conducted post-doctoral research at Nuffield College and St. Antony’s College, University of Oxford, and held positions of Assistant and Associate Professor of Sociology at Columbia University. He was a Visiting Professor of Sociology at the University of Michigan and a Visiting Fellow of Sociology at Yale University.

Professor Ishida’s research interests include comparative social stratification and mobility, school-to-work transition, and social inequality over the life course. He is the author of Social Mobility in Contemporary Japan (Stanford University Press) and the co-editor with David Slater of Social Class in Contemporary Japan (Routledge). His work has been published in a number of journals and edited volumes, including American Journal of Sociology, American Sociological Review, British Journal of Sociology, European Sociological Review, and Japanese Sociological Review.

Professor Ishida was the president of the Japanese Association of Mathematical Sociology from 2011 to 2013, and currently serves as the secretary/treasurer of the Research Committee on Social Stratification of the International Sociological Association. From 2005 to 2010, he was the editor-in-chief of Social Science Japan Journal, an international journal on social science research on Japan published by Oxford University Press. He is the principal investigator of the Japanese Life Course Panel Surveys, funded by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. He presently serves on the international editorial board of several journals, including British Journal of Sociology, European Sociological Review, and Social Forces. He is currently the Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) Official Representative for the University of Tokyo.

Featured Panel Presentation (2018) | Health Across the Lifecourse

Previous Presentations

Featured Panel Presentation (2017) | Easts Meets West – Healthy, Active and Beautiful Aging in Asia
James W. McNally
University of Michigan, USA & NACDA Program on Aging

Biography

Dr James W. McNally is the Director of the NACDA Program on Aging, a data archive containing over 1,500 studies related to health and the aging lifecourse. He currently does methodological research on the improvement and enhancement of secondary research data and has been cited as an expert authority on data imputation. Dr McNally has directed the NACDA Program on Aging since 1998 and has seen the archive significantly increase its holdings with a growing collection of seminal studies on the aging lifecourse, health, retirement and international aspects of aging. He has spent much of his career addressing methodological issues with a specific focus on specialized application of incomplete or deficient data and the enhancement of secondary data for research applications. Dr McNally has also worked extensively on issues related to international aging and changing perspectives on the role of family support in the later stages of the aging lifecourse.

Featured Panel Presentation (2018) | Health Across the Lifecourse
Featured Workshop Presentation (2018) | Locating Data for Research: Data Collections and Resources for Thesis Writing, Teaching, and Grant Development for the Social Sciences and the Environment

Previous Presentations

Featured Presentation (2017) | Methodologies for the Collection of Comparative Community Level Public Health Data: Obtaining Powerful and Statistically Meaningful Findings for Small Populations
Featured Panel Presentation (2017) | Easts Meets West – Healthy, Active and Beautiful Aging in Asia
Sela V. Panapasa
University of Michigan, USA

Biography

Dr Sela V. Panapasa studies family support and intergenerational exchanges among aged Pacific Islanders living in the US and Pacific region. Her work examines changes in elderly living arrangements and headship status in response to demographic and socioeconomic change. Her interests include family demography, race and ethnicity, measuring health disparities and comparative studies.

Haruko Satoh
Osaka University, Japan

Biography

Haruko Satoh is Specially Appointed Professor at the Graduate School of Engineering Science in charge of CAREN (Osaka University Centre for the Advancement of Research and Education Exchange Networks in Asia) and also lecturer at the Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), where she runs MEXT Reinventing Japan project on “Peace and Human Security in Asia (PAHSA)” with six Southeast Asian and four Japanese universities. She is also the President of the The Asian Political and International Studies Association (APISA).

In the past she has worked at the Japan Institute of International Affairs (JIIA), Chatham House, and Gaiko Forum. Her interests are primarily in state theory, Japanese nationalism and identity politics. Recent publications include: “Rethinking Security in Japan: In Search of a Post-‘Postwar’ Narrative” in Jain & Lam (eds), Japan’s Strategic Challenges in a Changing Regional Environment (World Scientific, 2012); “Through the Looking-glass: China’s Rise as Seen from Japan”, (co-authored with Toshiya Hoshino), Journal of Asian Public Policy, Vol. 5, No. 2, pp. 181-198 (July 2012); “Post-3.11 Japan: A Matter of Restoring Trust?”, ISPI Analysis No. 83 (December 2011); “Legitimacy Deficit in Japan: The Road to True Popular Sovereignty” in Kane, Loy & Patapan (eds), Political Legitimacy in Asia: New Leadership Challenges (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), “Japan: Re-engaging with China Meaningfully” in Tang, Li & Acharya (eds), Living with China: Regional States and China through Crises and Turning Points, (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009).

Professor Haruko Satoh is a member of IAFOR’s Academic Governing Board. She is Chair of the Politics, Law & International Relations section of the International Academic Advisory Board.

Featured Panel Presentation | East Meets West